corporate culture Tag

 The face of conference call catastrophes might just be Professor Robert Kelly, whose remote video interview  with BBC News was ambushed by his dancing toddler, curious baby, and horrified wife. Over the last 3 years, Kelly’s hilarious video has generated over 36 million views on YouTube. Kelly has also spawned numerous parodies, including this gem showing how an overachieving mom might handle the same situation, which has racked-up 22 millions views. Conference call interruptions in the Berman household are a little less cuddly, typically involving 2 teenage boys barging into my home office to bicker about whose turn it is to play Fortnite on the Xbox. With that as context, here are 5 field-tested tips for combatting conference call calamities while working from home: Location For those without a home office, it’s time to get creative. A helpful guideline is to identify a space with internet access, plenty of light, electrical outlets, room for a small desk+chair, and a door that can be barricaded! Got kids? Try to avoid the kitchen or living room, given these are often the busiest and noisiest spaces in a home with children. It’s also a smart move to stay out of your bedroom if possible, given the importance of preserving that space as a soothing sanctuary for sleep and other nocturnal activity. With that said, it may not be a bad idea to retreat into a walk-in closet for critical conference calls. Just be aware that your colleagues might get distracted by your colorful holiday sweater collection. Schedules & Rules The best way to pre-empt a conference call catastrophe may be to solidify structured schedules with your spouse and children. While outlining activities for kids will maintain a sense of school-like order, it will also help ensure that your children are busy precisely when you’re on a call. Nothing quite freezes frenetic kids like a replay of Frozen…for the 100th time. It’s also a smart thing to switch off with your spouse in keeping an eye on the kids. That allows each adult to break away for calls as needed. You might also take a cue from radio broadcasters by creating a simple “On the Air” sign that can be posted to your home office door, signaling to spouse and spawn alike that you shouldn’t be bothered. Look the Part It’s hard for family members to take your protestations for privacy seriously when you’re still dressed in PJs. So, take direction from the denizens of remote work gurus who advise home workers to wake-up, shower, and dress for a regular day at the office. That guidance not only helps you feel professional and productive, but it signals to roommates that you actually mean business. Of course, there may come a day (or two) when you decide not to shower. In that case, put on a company logo shirt and ballcap to hide your lack of hygiene while simultaneously showing your team spirit. Tech Up I happen to share a home office with my wife, Elizabeth, who previously preferred the echoing joys of speaker phones. Of course, that meant a nuclear arms race of me strapping on noise-cancelling Bose headphones. I soon introduced Elizabeth to the beauty of Apple AirPods, which she now swears by. Peace and quiet have since reigned throughout the kingdom of Bermania. So, indulge in a pair of high-quality headsets. I happen to be a fan of the Apple AirPods Pro, which include noise cancelling technology that is pretty solid. You should also ensure you’re visible on video calls by shining a light on your face be it from a window or lamp. That’s especially important if there’s a strong light source behind you, like a window, that will cast a shadow on your face worthy of Darth Sidious from Star Wars. In addition, raise your monitor and camera up so that they’re level with the height of your face. Otherwise, you may be inadvertently creating a Blair Witch effect from a low camera filming up at you, thereby showcasing your nasal passages to video call participants. You’re welcome : ) Video vs. Audio It’s easy to default to audio-only calls when you’re setting-up a virtual meeting with colleagues or clients. I certainly understand plenty of people don’t like to look at themselves on camera or are embarrassed by their home surroundings in the background of a Zoom frame. However, there are a number of reasons to avoid the temptation of audio-only. First, a significant amount of successful communication comes from the non-verbal cues of facial expressions and body language. Afterall, a colleague calling your suggestion “interesting” while smiling, nodding and leaning in, is quite different than the same colleague saying “interesting” while tightening their lips, shaking their head, crossing their arms, and leaning back in their chair…especially if they fly the bird at you : ) Second, the knowledge of being on camera during a call acts to curtail colleagues from multi-tasking, given how easy it is to spot distracted colleagues. Third, seeing your colleagues on camera helps solidify team cohesiveness and camaraderie at a time when many co-workers may feel isolated and lonely. So, there you have it - 5 tips to transform your home office communications and avoid conference call calamities. Yes, I will be scouring YouTube to confirm those desk jockeys not heeding this advice. The good news is home office door deadbolt locks are now on discount at Home Depot for the rest of the week! About the AuthorJordan Berman is the Founder & CEO of OFC (ofc.tv), a creative agency and video production studio that injects storytelling into employee communications and training to earn attention and inspire action. OFC lives by the words, TYPICAL IS INVISIBLE™, and resides at the intersection of pop culture and office culture to build multimedia campaigns that create buzz, drive engagement and maximize results one cubicle at a time. Clients include PepsiCo, AT&T, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Motorola Solutions. Jordan previously held senior marketing positions at MTV, Showtime, AT&T, Black & Decker, and the DDB agency. He has a BS in Industrial & Labor Relations from Cornell and an MBA from NYU....

 OFC is excited to launch Shortcuts: Smart Storytelling Solutions, a new video series for corporate communicators that showcases creative ways to earn employee attention and inspire action. Episode #1 explores how to create a virtual video studio by taking a note from YouTube and leveraging the power of user generated content (UGC) to capture executive and employee stories. It’s all about leveling-up the authenticity of leader communications and propelling peer-to-peer learning by unleashing your inner Spielberg with a smartphone! Nothing matches the ability of video to win employee hearts and minds. So, get going and get creative![embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cg6bnMLRrY8&feature=youtu.be[/embed]Watch episode #1 “Virtual Studio For The Virtual Office”  above, or read the episode transcript below.Video TranscriptIn this era of remote work, out of sight can mean out of mind. It’s therefore imperative that companies inform and inspire their isolated employees with new approaches to video communication. While Zoom and Skype are great for LIVE video conferencing, OFC recommends 3 approaches for creating ON DEMAND video content.Video User-Generated Content ("UGC" in graphic) invites colleagues to film clips on their smartphones and web cams, for submission to OFC, which edits clips into compelling content with b-roll footage, motion graphics and music. Follow the 3Ls for capturing great clips: hold the phone in landscape mode, shine light on your face, and listen to ensure you film in a quiet location. Cute babies are optional. Audio User Generated Content asks colleagues to record improvised or scripted voice memos on their mobile devices, which OFC will combine with kinetic text, motion graphics, animation and music. You got a voice? You got a video!Animated Explainer Videos offer unlimited options to elevate executive communications and bring clarity to new ways of working. OFC provides professionally written scripts, voiceovers and music to really bring leadership messaging to life.Your virtual office requires a virtual studio, where OFC can collect employee clips and assemble them into compelling videos that earn colleague attention and inspire action. From company leaders to frontline employees, it’s all about surfacing staff stories that supercharge performance with purpose. About the AuthorJordan Berman is the Founder & CEO of OFC (ofc.tv), a creative agency and video production studio that injects storytelling into employee communications and training to earn attention and inspire action. OFC lives by the words, TYPICAL IS INVISIBLE™, and resides at the intersection of pop culture and office culture to build multimedia campaigns that create buzz, drive engagement and maximize results one cubicle at a time. Clients include PepsiCo, AT&T, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Motorola Solutions. Jordan previously held senior marketing positions at MTV, Showtime, AT&T, Black & Decker, and the DDB agency. He has a BS in Industrial & Labor Relations from Cornell and an MBA from NYU....

 Kate Winslet steps up onto the rail of the Titanic as Leonardo DiCaprio steadies her from behind. Wind coursing through her hair, Winslet exclaims, “I’m flying!” Had Winslet worked in modern day corporate communications, she might be flying without a net in readying her company colleagues to work remotely. That’s because a majority of leaders appear to be relying solely on technology to prepare their workforces to perform from home offices. Read on to learn why tech is just the tip of the remote work iceberg, and how smart teams are navigating around the obstacles to success by mastering culture and communications. AN APP FOR EVERYTHINGAs you’d expect, tech firms have offered-up software as THE solution to your remote work challenges. In fact, many of these offerings are quite good. Solutions span a spectrum of use cases, from that old stalwart of email to apps that can tame nearly any task on your to-do list:Communicating with employees (Dynamic Signal, Speakap, Yammer, Jive) Distributing video (Kaltura, Brightcove, Ooyala) Call forwarding/answering (Talkroute.com) Scheduling meetings (Calendly.com) Voice conferencing (FreeConferenceCalling.com) Video conferencing (Google Hangouts, Zoom, Bluejeans, GoToMeeting) Messaging (Slack, Google Hangouts, Teams, FB Messenger, Whatsapp, WeChat, Speakap, Skype Business) Collaborating (Google G-Suite) Managing projects & workflow (Clubhouse, Trello, Zoho, Basecamp) Shelly Palmer wrote an excellent article on his experience with many of these apps. TOO MUCH TECHWith that said, too much of a good tech thing can be overwhelming. And that’s most certainly true of workplace productivity apps. A recent Ring Central study of 2,000+ knowledge workers uncovered 3 eye-opening findings:Employees use at least four business productivity apps on average, and 20% are using six or more. 68% of employees toggle between apps up to 10 times an hour. 69% of employees waste an hour a day or the equivalent of 32 days each year navigating between apps. So, be sure to match the right apps with the unique ways people work and communicate best in your organization. It’s then up to your communications team to articulate how and when employees should use those apps, with a focus on getting things done in a remote world. After all, the apps are merely tools to aid effectiveness, whether your company sells soda, produces prescription medication, or creates cybersecurity software. CULTURE TO COMPLEMENT TECHLike an unstoppable force meeting an immovable object, the unspoken workplace rules of old school managers are clashing with the newfound flexibility enabled by apps. It used to be that “hard work” equated to sitting at your desk for long hours. “Commitment” meant arriving early and leaving late…as long as you walked by the boss’ office for that all-important visual verification. The culture clash between command-and-control supervision and modern management is underway, like fisticuffs between Billy Zane and Leonardo DiCaprio.This rift between remote tech and traditional ways of working gives rise to one of the most important opportunities for communication leaders. That opportunity is rewriting the rules of office culture for a remote world. It’s about embracing clear expectations, measuring meaningful outcomes, and verifying deliverables with hard data instead of applauding workplace theatrics. This will require a new level of rigor in identifying goals and objectives, along with coaching team members via continuous and constructive conversations. COMMUNICATION BEYOND THE BREAKROOM FLYERAt its simplest, communication involves 2 variables: content and channels. The rules behind compelling content are still intact, coronavirus be damned.Company messaging must earn employee attention for a chance to raise awareness, secure buy-in, and impact behavior around key business initiatives. That can be achieved in the following ways:Subject lines, headlines, layouts, video messages, and presentations must be interesting and unique to catch the eyes and ears of employees who are still earning their sea legs during the daily distractions of a home office environment. Content needs to inform with a level of clarity and concision to drive retention of important information Content must inspire action so that every individual can help move the company’s agenda by breaking organizational inertia to get things done. And how about the channels for delivering your content to employees? Say goodbye (for now) to in-person town halls, digital screens in hallways, posters and flyers on breakroom bulletin boards, and memos displayed above urinals and bathroom stall doors. Instead, look for new places to win share of mind with remote workers.Email may still be the cruiseliner of communications (large, traditional, reliable), but on-demand video is the speedboat of storytelling, powered by sight, sound and motion. That’s because the most effective messaging medium elicits both a rational and emotional response to win employee hearts and minds. Humans feel more connected when they see one another, especially given the importance of non-verbal communication and body language in remote communications. The channels by which to transmit that video include your email, intranet, and social messaging platform. VIRTUAL VIDEO STUDIO FOR A VIRTUAL OFFICEWhat to do when your internal video studio is closed? Create a virtual studio! Take a note from YouTube and ask executives and employees to record video clips that communicate culture and best practices. User-generated content (UGC) can be extremely powerful for peer-to-peer learning and leveling-up the authenticity of leader communications. While most team members may not be Spielberg or Scorsese with a smartphone, virtual studios like OFC can curate UGC videos (and pics) and then combine them with graphics, animation and music during the edit process to surface amazing stories. Employees can also submit voice memos that are brought to life with motion graphics and kinetic text to transform training and announcements into must-watch clips. Animated explainer videos are also exceptionally effective at conveying complex ideas when produced from professionally written scripts, voiceovers and music. Best of all, the above video approaches can be flawlessly executed in a virtual environment. The key is getting expert guidance on soliciting UGC from your executives & employees, curating/organizing the best content, and then transforming raw footage into high impact storytelling that earns attention and inspires action. With OFC as your crew-mate, you can become the James Cameron of corporate user-generated content : ) About the AuthorJordan Berman is the Founder & CEO of OFC (ofc.tv), a creative agency and video production studio that injects storytelling into employee communications and training to earn attention and inspire action. OFC lives by the words, TYPICAL IS INVISIBLE™, and resides at the intersection of pop culture and office culture to build multimedia campaigns that create buzz, drive engagement and maximize results one cubicle at a time. Clients include PepsiCo, AT&T, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Motorola Solutions. Jordan previously held senior marketing positions at MTV, Showtime, AT&T, Black & Decker, and the DDB agency. He has a BS in Industrial & Labor Relations from Cornell and an MBA from NYU....

“She’s coming on boys. She’s coming on real strong.” Those foreboding words were delivered by George Clooney in the 2000 biographical disaster film, The Perfect Storm . The Hollywood heartthrob and Casamigos tequila pitchman could very well have been talking about the convergence of 3 workplace trends propelling the popularity of remote work years before the current spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). Dive in for more detail on the benefits of remote work that have transformed it from an employee perk to a business imperative. WORKPLACE TRENDS Trend #1: Open Floor Plans The first workplace trend is anchored by the proliferation of open office plans. Approximately 70% of offices now feature some sort of open floor plan. These workspaces have parted ways with high cubicle walls in favor of communal tables, open workstations, and “hoteling,” where employees can work at any available desk. Studies have shown such arrangements often lead to increases in employee sick days, along with questionable benefits to collaboration, productivity and morale, especially when office architects fail to provide noise cancelling solutions and activity-based spaces. This shouldn’t be a surprise, given cubicle partitions - the physical barriers shielding healthy employees from sick employees - have fallen like a beige fabric-covered Berlin Wall. Add in contagions clinging to keyboards, cabinets, coffee makers, and copy machines, and you’ve got a workplace petri dish. Don’t even get me started on the state of workplace bathrooms! Trend #2: Hustle Culture This leads to the second workplace trend of “hustle culture” promoted by evangelists like Gary Vaynerchuck, who preach their “rise & grind” ethos to millennials striving for career success. This single-minded focus on outworking others often results in increased stress and sleep deprivation, leading Reddit Co-Founder, Alexis Ohanian, to brand it as “hustle porn.” As an entrepreneur for 10-years, I’ve lived the hustle lifestyle and can attest it’s the fastest path to burnout and bad health. Trend #3: Freelancers The third trend deals with the rise of freelance workers and contractors, who receive limited or no paid sick days from their employers. More than 35% of Americans freelanced in 2018, which is an increase of 7% since 2013. By comparison, the percentage of non-freelancers only grew by 2%. As expected, the majority of freelancers (47%) are millennials, and these gig economy employees are often reticent to take sick days, knowing they’ll have to forego income. In fact, more than 25% of the American workforce doesn’t get any sick leave, which accounts for more than 50% of part-time workers and roughly 40% of service workers. Approximately 30% of private U.S. employees get no medical benefits via their employers, according to government data. The result is a flock of full-time and freelance workers grinding away in open offices where a hacking cough travels faster than word of free donuts in the conference room. REMOTE WORK ON THE RISE It’s no wonder remote work is starting to look “wicked good,” as Clooney’s fellow fisherman, Mark Wahlberg, might’ve said. A 2018 study from Upwork found 63% of companies now have remote workers, with a majority of surveyed hiring managers stating they believe offices will become temporary anchor points rather than daily travel destinations. Much to Marissa Mayer’s chagrin (the ex-Yahoo CEO banned remote work), a recent State of Remote Work Report showed 90% of remote workers plan to keep working remotely for the rest of their career. BENEFITS OF REMOTE WORK A Microsoft whitepaper, Work without Walls, ranked the top 10 benefits from an employee perspective: (1) Work/life balance: increased time at home improves overall quality of life. (2) Save gas: reduced mileage is associated with fewer commute days. (3) Avoid traffic: reduced driving during rush hour to urban and suburban offices. (4) More productivity: increased ability to deliver on work objectives. (5) Less distractions: reduced interruptions from co-workers and office chatter. (6) Eliminate long commutes: reduced trips from home to office where the average American commute is 27-minutes one way. (7) Quieter atmosphere: reduced noise in home vs. the clamor of open floor plans. (8) Less stressful environment: increased comfort of home surroundings vs. office. (9) More time with family: increased family time during mornings and evenings. (10) Environmentally friendly: decreased pollution from commute, dry cleaning, etc. It’s hard for management to argue with these benefits, especially when Gallup research cites employees are 43% less likely to experience burnout when provided a choice with regards to how, when and where they complete work tasks. It should also be noted that many employees increase their overall work hours when remote, in appreciation of their employer’s flexibility and in acknowledgement of the time they’ve saved without a commute. In addition, employers with remote or telework programs often find they can recruit from a larger talent pool and increase employee diversity while lowering overhead costs and improving productivity. What’s not to like?! OFFICE VS. HOME OFFICE As with nearly all things, the question of office vs remote work can best be answered by “and” instead of “or.” During the past 8-years, I’ve found my OFC team functions best in terms of creativity and productivity by splitting the week between office and home. Our in-office time is concentrated at the beginning of the week when we kick-off new projects, set strategy, and bond as a team over lunch, coffee breaks, ping pong, and walks with our office mascot (my dog, Kayla : ) Our remote time begins mid-week where the balance of work often shifts in favor of production activity requiring intense levels of concentration and independence. Through it all, we stay connected with a variety of communication and collaboration apps like Basecamp, Google’s G-Suite, and Zoom. Stay tuned for the second part of this remote work voyage next week, when I focus on the changes in culture, technology and communication required to mobilize a disbursed workforce. Until then, batten down the hatches as things are about to get very interesting.About the Author Jordan Berman is the Founder & CEO of OFC (ofc.tv), a creative agency and video production studio that injects storytelling into employee communications and training to earn attention and inspire action. OFC lives by the words, TYPICAL IS INVISIBLE™, and resides at the intersection of pop culture and office culture to build multimedia campaigns that create buzz, drive engagement and maximize results one cubicle at a time. Clients include PepsiCo, AT&T, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Motorola Solutions. Jordan previously held senior marketing positions at MTV, Showtime, AT&T, Black & Decker, and the DDB agency. He has a BS in Industrial & Labor Relations from Cornell and an MBA from NYU....

  Change is never easy. Especially when organizations have to make hard decisions involving cost cutting, downsizing and restructuring. Amid difficult transitions, it is crucial that employee engagement is still top of mind. However, as leaders struggle to build alignment with new directions and inspire employees to work in new ways that often involve doing more with less, this isn’t always easy. For the sake of your organization maintaining quality in products and services as well as laying a foundation for future growth, we’ve provided a few helpful tips for employee engagement. Read below to find out how to keep employees engaged and enabled amid difficult organizational transitions for a smooth transformation: Be honest and consistent. Don’t dance around issues when someone asks you a question. Be honest and genuine. Letting them know that you have their backs will make them feel safe. If you don’t have the authorization to discuss that topic, be honest and tell them that. Be consistent in the answers you tell everyone in order to keep your reputation and build credibility & loyalty. Meet in-person. In order to minimize rumors, have formal meetings with your department and share any insights you may have. This is also an opportunity to genuinely engage with your employees and evaluate their mindset. Take the time to talk things out and lighten the mood. By doing so, you’ll have a better chance at not losing touch with what matters to your employees in order to keep productivity up. Listen and pay close attention to everything that is taking place. Write notes down so you can refer to them during your next staff meeting with colleagues. By comparing and discussing collective knowledge that comes from all department leaders, you’ll be provided with greater insights that can help you neutralize tension from employees to keep engagement intact.   What big organizational transitions are you currently working through?    ...

  Every successful company has a strong, cohesive team behind it. It’s no wonder corporate culture is becoming top priority for corporations & small businesses alike. Here are ways you can make sure you’re building a strong team and a great work environment: Show your team you value them with unique rewards. Teams perform better if they know they are valued and feel the work they do matters. Come up with creative ideas to show your team how important they are and reward them for their hard work. Treat them to happy hour or take them to a nice lunch.Celebrate big and small wins. Recognize and celebrate small wins like positive client feedback as well as the big wins to boost motivation & performance.Encourage teammates to congratulate each other. Having teammates share wins and special moments with each other creates a positive work culture & boosts morale.Plan awesome team building events that people actually want to participate in. Think outside the box to come up with activities that are exciting, rare and special to make participating irresistible.Embrace Flexibility. Being able to work remotely or have flexible work hours boosts company culture, employee morale and promotes stronger loyalty to the company.Welcome honest feedback about processes. Send out a survey or hold an employee focus group where all employees are encouraged to share their honest feedback about which processes they find work and which ones need to be tweaked. Eliminating inefficient processes and listen to creative solutions from the ground up.  ...

It's no surprise that communication issues in the workplace are not an uncommon thing. Whether it comes down to miscommunication, confusing directives, or simply a lack of communication, the end result is a decrease in productivity. According to a survey in HR Magazine, participants said they wasted approximately 40 minutes a day trying to interpret improperly communicated directions. 40 Minutes a day is an incredible amount of time to waste and adds up over time.Outside of wasted time, a lack of communication also impacts the relationship between employees and management. If employees feel they are not being communicated with enough or that management refuses to create an open dialogue, they will underperform and this can lead to higher job turnover rates and an increase in absenteeism.But we don’t need to continue these failing communication practices! There is great room for improvement by doing simple things on a daily basis. Whether your work environment has communication issues or not, there is always room for improvement with a few simple steps. Here is how you can improve communications in your workplace starting today: Create an Open DialogueCreating an environment where employees can ask questions, voice their concerns, and understand the company better will help everyone. It will make the employees more knowledgeable about the company’s goals and upcoming/current projects, as well as allow management to understand where communication is lacking.Try holding weekly or monthly meetings where these topics can be brought up. Make it a priority to walk around the office checking in on your employees or on those working on projects where communication is key. Emphasize an “Open Door Policy” as a platform for answering questions and creating an open discourse where all questions are important. If one person doesn’t understand their job directives, then productivity may suffer. Discourage One Way CommunicationA top down communications approach is common throughout the workplace, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the right way of doing things. Encourage feedback on your managerial practices or allow them to suggest projects and initiatives that they find compelling. Celebrate Success!Whether it’s obtaining a new client or successfully meeting your monthly quotas, celebrating achievements can boost any employee’s mood! It also shows your employees just how important their everyday efforts are. Positive reinforcement will improve employee morale as they feel noticed and applauded while also increasing productivity. Celebrating their success will encourage them to keep up the good work and push for higher success.While these steps aren’t an immediate fix to a deeper problem, they’re a start in the right direction. If you focus on creating an open dialogue, improving the channel of communication, and begin focusing on achievements, your workplace communication is only going to improve. Learn more about how you can keep your internal communications plans relevant & useful for employees and how to gain better employee insights by using your communications network....

While change is never fun or easy, it’s necessary for creating a successful and evolving industry. From new technology to new business practices, we have to constantly be looking for new ways to enhance our already established behaviors. This involves having a keen eye for industry changes on both an individual and organizational basis. Change is Universal Instead of focusing on one area where change is necessary, take a holistic approach. Make sure you change the way your business practices reflect the change in technology. From training to development to operating, all of these areas must adapt to large scale change. Remember to look at all areas of your organization to see how change might affect them.   Lead By Example At the end of the day, change begins with you! Employees may understand directives and new procedures at face value, but it’s difficult to just put a new set of rules in place and say "Go"! Work on putting new changes into place one by one - a directive here, a new workplace behavior there - and begin by making the change yourself. Be a model for your employees. If you’re the one desiring and implementing change, you must be the one to show change at work. You’re a leader in the company, so lead! Your employees will see your shining example and will follow without even realizing it. Utilize the Front Line While an emphasis has been placed on your involvement in implementing change, don’t forget the brilliance of your hardworking employees. They are on the ground floor every day, working with all aspects of your company. Brainstorm ideas early on to get an idea of how change might affect their jobs. They will also be great at highlighting what issues might occur, especially if customers or a change in technology is concerned. Your front line handles the every day tasks of your company, so involve them and ensure that change is truly beneficial for your company. Change doesn’t happen overnight and can often be difficult to implement, but these steps will help guide you in the right direction. By following these directives, you’ll show how you can be a leader in change management - and your company will thank you. Don't forget to check out our Ultimate Guide to Successful Change Management!...

The world is changing every day. Millennials are joining the workforce, people are redefining what successful company culture looks like, and companies are evolving into a new age of technology. Here are a few trends you need to watch and implement into your company.Education. You’re probably wondering how education can be a trend. According to a study at Deloitte, two-thirds of millennials believe it’s their employers job “to provide them with accelerated development opportunities in order for them to stay.” With many enticing opportunities out there, creating education opportunities for your employees will encourage them to find a home at your company. Re-define the Workforce. While full-time employees are normally the bread and butter of the workplace, it’s time to shake that tired notion up! The working world is changing, which means the way we work is changing too. Instead of only hiring full-time employees, consider hiring freelancers, contractors, consultants, part-time employees, etc. For highly specialized projects, experts can be called in to consult instead of having them staffed full-time, which can prove a little too pricey.All of these workers fall under what’s called Gig Economy, a new trend emerging in the workforce. According to WhatIs.com, Gig Economy helps businesses save valuable resources when it comes to office space, training, and benefits. Utilize Your Space. Open office spaces have been a trend for a while now. Allow employees to choose where and how they complete their work while also allocating spaces specifically for collaboration. Creating more collaboration areas around the office emphasizes how important teamwork is to your organization. Real-Time Feedback. Employee evaluations are a practice that benefits both, employees and their employers, but the workplace is changing and it’s leaving no stone unturned. Instead of quarterly or bi-annual reviews, the new trend is instant feedback. Are you working on a project and your employee does something spectacular? Let them know right then and there. Don’t save your praise for a later date. It’ll mean more in the moment and show that you’re always watching. While engaging with an employee, do you hear them directly misunderstanding that day’s task? Let them know in a constructive way. Don’t let it wait or pass it to lower management.Both praise and constructive criticism are now happening at each moment of the day instead of waiting for timely evaluations. This also goes for celebrating achievements or meeting long-term or short-term goals. Highlight the team, not just the individual. This ties into creating collaborative spaces to highlight growing collaboration in the office. When training employees, make sure you also focus on how they’ll be working together as a team. Your company runs as a whole without one person being the sole reason for the company’s success. That means they need to learn how to work together as a unified singular unit. Create business practices that focus on the unit and less on the whole. Whether this blends with hiring practices or real estate, the new trend is creating a unified workforce.These are just a few corporate culture trends that will ensure your employees are engaged, working together, and on their A-Game. The new trend is a holistic approach to the workplace where everything from the office building to training is important for employee development. Keep this in mind when you’re analyzing your corporate culture and seeking out further change....

Earning employee attention around important initiatives is hard enough. Trying to earn their attention to complete a survey? – even harder!  Here are easy ways to increase survey participation among employees so you can gain better employee insights:  Don’t compete for attention. Check your calendars and schedule your survey when there aren’t a ton of higher priority items competing for attention. Send a few reminders. Things pop up at all times of the day and people are forgetful. Don’t underestimate the power of friendly reminders. Award prizes/make it fun. Have a critical survey right before a big holiday when employees are distracted? Prizes are a great incentive and way to earn attention. Use a conversational tone. Questionnaires don’t have to sound stiff. Have some fun and use unique labels for your scales (instead of “very dissatisfied/very satisfied” use “grumpy/happy”). Keep it short & sweet. Don’t overload the survey with unnecessary questions. Also, make sure your question wording is easy to comprehend. Be transparent. Tell the respondents what the purpose of the research is and how their feedback will be used. Easy Access. Make sure your survey is easy to access. Include a “notes” section. If you’re not asking 1-2 open ended questions, make sure you have a section where respondents can share open comments & provide more information. Make it anonymous. Respondents may be more open to providing honest answers if the survey is anonymous. ...

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