employee insights Tag

To make any new communication plan effective, it’s vital to include measurement moments to know where that plan should be adjusted. Adjustments can include anything from changing key messages & tactics to changing communications channels.Here are a few ways you can improve the impact of your messaging to ensure your internal communications plans stay relevant & useful for employees.Spot surveys. When you’re trying to build awareness or a deeper knowledge, a spot survey will let you know if you’re actually breaking through to your target audience. You can repeat the survey during different stages of your communication plan to see if there is any progress along the way. Focus groups. Getting honest feedback is crucial to any corporate communication initiative. Whether you set up your own “insights” focus group or just ask your colleagues, you can improve internal communication by focusing on these 3 essentials. Questions from employees. Collecting questions via email, during meetings & town halls, and intranet pages provides clues about what you need to further address & communicate. Participation data. Are employees using the tools you created? If you’re using a microsite or an app to push out important information about a new initiative, be sure to use analytics to see which pages employees are visiting and if they’re bouncing around to other pages for more information. Inspire, Educate, Reinforce. Once you announce a new initiative, don’t stop there. It’s important to keep building momentum and keep pushing out more information. Here are easy ways to increase survey participation among employees so you can gain better employee insights....

Earning employee attention around important initiatives is hard enough. Trying to earn their attention to complete a survey? – even harder!  Here are easy ways to increase survey participation among employees so you can gain better employee insights:  Don’t compete for attention. Check your calendars and schedule your survey when there aren’t a ton of higher priority items competing for attention. Send a few reminders. Things pop up at all times of the day and people are forgetful. Don’t underestimate the power of friendly reminders. Award prizes/make it fun. Have a critical survey right before a big holiday when employees are distracted? Prizes are a great incentive and way to earn attention. Use a conversational tone. Questionnaires don’t have to sound stiff. Have some fun and use unique labels for your scales (instead of “very dissatisfied/very satisfied” use “grumpy/happy”). Keep it short & sweet. Don’t overload the survey with unnecessary questions. Also, make sure your question wording is easy to comprehend. Be transparent. Tell the respondents what the purpose of the research is and how their feedback will be used. Easy Access. Make sure your survey is easy to access. Include a “notes” section. If you’re not asking 1-2 open ended questions, make sure you have a section where respondents can share open comments & provide more information. Make it anonymous. Respondents may be more open to providing honest answers if the survey is anonymous. ...

Your responsibility as a communicator is to create, plan and execute your message using insights. Getting honest feedback is crucial to any corporate communication initiative. Whether you set up your own “insights” focus group or just ask your colleagues, you can improve internal communication by focusing on 3 essentials:Include representation from across the organization. This includes high-level executives to frontline employees and every level in between. Clearly communicate the group’s role and your expectations. What exactly are you trying to accomplish by having this conversation? How will their feedback be used? Communicate the impact of all participants’ input. Sometimes just knowing that their input will have an impact and how it will be used will make all the difference in getting honest feedback. Use your communication network as a research tool to gather feedback by asking important questions about specific initiatives/tactics. Here are a few examples:For feedback on a communication plan: Is there a tactic that’s missing? Build a foundation for communication planning: Share an upcoming change and ask what questions come to mind. What can be communicated more clearly? What initial hesitations are there? Gather ideas for content & announcements: What kind of content would stand out the most? What methods resonate best with each level/department? Create a network of change champions: Gather colleagues you trust and prepare them to gauge attitudes from their departments. This feedback is crucial. Test key deliverables: Once you decide on the right content or announcement method, test them individually. One-page overview? Video? Show it to some key individuals for constructive feedback. Ask about recent communications: Refer to another recent campaign or initiative launch. Do they have a question that was never answered? What would they change about the communication strategy? Use these findings and incorporate them in the announcement to come. How do you gather employee insights at your company?...

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