video Tag

When you need to communicate a rollout of new initiatives, win hearts and minds around corporate change, position your brand for success, or even shine the spotlight on stand-out employees, video is definitely the way to go. We can all agree that not all corporate videos are created equal. In fact, most of them are a one-way ticket to snoozeville. So how do you create a video for your business that not only doesn’t suck, but will actually engage your audience and make your message resonate? We typically tell clients that 80% of the work that goes into creating an engaging video is weaving creativity and enthusiasm into the pre-production process. Here is your ultimate guide to creating a corporate video that doesn’t suck: Step One: Goal. What purpose is this video going to serve? When planning the flow of your corporate video, it’s important to decide on key messages and main points that you want to highlight. What do you want the call to action to be? Clearly defining the purpose of the video early on will help form the basis of your storyboard and keep everyone focused & on track. Step Two: Audience. Who is your target audience? Will this video be internal facing, external facing or both? Business to business, customers, or employees? Step Three: Topic. What are the main points you want to cover with your video? Are you launching a new initiative? Explaining a new product or service? Conveying a new direction your company is going in? Highlight all the areas you’d like to cover in the video. Step Four: Type. What type of video do you want to produce? Serious, funny, mockumentary? Do you want to include animation, motion graphics, subtitles, etc? Step Five: Script. The storyboard is a visual representation of the script that helps visualize the feel and tone of your video before production starts. The script should include any text, whether it’s spoken, sang, written, or typed that is going to appear in your video. Step Six: Location. Is the video going to be shot on location or in a studio? If so, do you need any permits to shoot at that location? Or are you simply reusing existing b-roll footage already in your content library? Step Seven: Talent. Who will you feature in the video? Are you going to feature internal high-level executives or frontline employees? Do you need to coordinate with a casting agency to find talent such as actors or voice over artists? Step Eight: Special FX. What type of special effects are you going to need for your video? CGI? Green screens? Step Nine: Deliverables. What medium do you want to use to market your video? Do you want to house the video on the company intranet, blast it out in an email, or perhaps publish the video online on YouTube or Vimeo? Step Ten: Distribute. How will you get your video out to your audience? Will you be premiering the video at a town hall meeting, using it in trainings and on boarding, housing on your company website, promoting on social media or blasting it out via email? What to avoid:Unnatural scripted storylines. Unnecessary visual effects. Overly enthusiastic speakers that sound fake & scripted. Awkward transitions. Making the video too long. No clear objective for your video. No clear call to action. Trying to deliver too many messages in one video. Stale talking head videos with no action b-roll.  ...

Thanks to smartphones, capturing high quality videos on cellphones has never been easier. However, poor operating techniques will result in a poor video. Follow the 4 "L"s of videography to capture the perfect videos on your cellphone:LIGHT.A video is only as good as what you can see. And to see, you’ll need light on the person, place or thing you're filming. So, be sure to have the light source in front of your subject rather than behind. This will avoid shadows covering your subjects' face as the light will shine directly on them. All you have to do is move around your subject unAl the light looks right. Once you confirm the light is good, you can press on your screen where the subject is. That will focus the camera so the picture looks sharp instead of blurry. Holding onto an iPhone screen for a few seconds will lock-in that focus. Your focus is locked when the AE/AF icon appears (auto exposure/auto focus).LISTEN.Unless you're making an ol' time silent film, sound quality is critical. So, film your subject in a location that is fairly quiet. If you have to film in a noisy location, direct your subject to speak in a clear and loud voice, even if it seems awkward. You can also move your mobile device closer to the subject for better audio recording. Physically move closer to the subject rather than zooming-in on the screen. Zooming-in reduces the picture quality and resolution.LANDSCAPE.We naturally hold our phones in vertical portrait mode when talking, texting or surfing the web. However, it's very important to angle your phone in horizontal landscape mode when you film video (see visual above). That’s because holding your phone horizontally captures video in the widescreen dimension of 16:9. That dimension looks best when watched on a phone, computer or TV. Otherwise, your vertical video takes up just a small slice of the screen. Be sure to grip your phone firmly with two hands, using your thumb and index fingers while being sure to keep your fingers clear of the camera lens and microphone. It also helps to tuck your elbows in or out while standing shoulder feet apart to keep the lens nice and steady. If you’ve got the balance of a ninja, feel free to film in crane kick stance : ) Lastly, slide your phone into airplane mode so the recording doesn't get interrupted by a phone call or text message.LINES.Ask the people you’re filming to wear solid colors rather than lines, stripes or patterns as that might cause visual interference with the video....

Engage employees when cat videos conquer the coffee break!

Talk to us