working from home Tag

As companies ramp-up plans for a return to the office, most employees still relish remote work life. Read on to uncover 6 reasons why employees should return that can inform a successful "Back to the Office" communication campaign!   Making the Case to ColleaguesAccording to a recent survey, two-thirds of organizations will resume in-office operations by the end of the summer (WorldatWork). However, data shows most U.S. employees (59%) want to continue working from home as much as possible once business and school closures are lifted (Gallup). This disconnect reinforces the imperative for companies to not only explain how their employees will return to the office, but why they should return. This is where a high impact, multi-media employee communications campaign can make all the difference. Be sure to incorporate OFC’s “6C” messaging framework to earn employee hearts and minds, so they’re inspired to go Back to the Office with confidence!  6 Reasons to Return to the OfficeA successful workplace transition campaign will position a return to the office as a win for employees and the company. The right messaging acknowledges a more flexible and personal work culture where management treats their employees as “people who work, rather than workers who happen to be people” (Gallup). OFC’s “6C” framework hits the intersection of workforce wellbeing and effectiveness, backed by powerful research.Care: Workforce health and safety is a foundational commitment companies make to employees.The starting point for all employee communications is the promise of providing for their physical and psychological safety by deploying the necessary resources, processes, expertise, and transparency. Camaraderie: Companies are communities where social connections with work friends and colleagues are critical. In the absence of office life, employees can experience structural isolation where they feel ignored and cut-off from the business, which triggers an emotional feeling of loneliness. One study found workplace isolation can derail productivity up to 21% (Gallup), in addition to adverse effects on mental health. In-person interaction with leaders is also crucial for mentoring and career development. Coexistence: An office away from home helps define healthy boundaries between work and personal life. That’s especially true during COVID when many employees are forced to juggle childcare, home   schooling and meal preparation with their jobs. This lack of balance can lead to exhaustion, especially since more than half of remote workers report they lack a dedicated desk, personal computer, laptop or reliable internet connection (Asana). Collaboration: In-person interaction is the most effective and energizing form of communication.While video meeting apps like Zoom and Microsoft Teams offer a workable experience, delayed video signals result in stilted conversations and unblinking camera eyes are awkward to stare at (NYTimes). This suboptimal experience triggers Zoom fatigue, which is compounded by non-stop email and instant messages from colleagues who feel a need to over-communicate in the absence of in-person talks. Creativity: Innovation often results from unexpected pairings of employees that bring disparate views together. People from different departments often bump into one another at the cafeteria, in the breakroom or at after-work events. Unfortunately, remote work data shows employee contact with more distant colleagues outside of their inner circle has dropped by 30%, significantly reducing the likelihood of chance encounters spurring new kinds of creative thinking (Humanyze). Culture: Norms that unite employees around values and ways we work are best experienced in the workplace. Embedding culture in a remote environment is a difficult task that is now dependent on individual managers. Research suggests people find it hard to build cohesion and trust online as compared to in-person, where rates of cooperation rise dramatically with face-to-face meetings (Berkeley). Plan Your "Back to the Office" Campaign with OFC   Contact Jordan Berman, OFC Founder & CEO, at jordan@ofc.tv or 609-558-5309 to explore how the right campaign fusing smart strategy and compelling creative can ensure a successful return-to-office transition.  About the AuthorJordan Berman is the Founder & CEO of OFC (ofc.tv), a creative agency and video production studio that injects storytelling into employee communications and training to earn attention and inspire action. OFC lives by the words, TYPICAL IS INVISIBLE™, and resides at the intersection of pop culture and office culture to build multimedia campaigns that create buzz, drive engagement and maximize results one cubicle at a time. Clients include PepsiCo, AT&T, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Motorola Solutions. Jordan previously held senior marketing positions at MTV, Showtime, AT&T, Black & Decker, and the DDB agency. He has a BS in Industrial & Labor Relations from Cornell and an MBA from NYU....

Are you becoming a Zoom Zombie? Episode #8 of OFC SHORTCUTS shares 4 tips on how to avoid dreaded Zoom fatigue. Watch and learn best practices for video conferencing so that you don’t burnout from being on-camera 24/7. To Zoom or not to Zoom? That is the question!Watch the video below, or continue scrolling to read the full transcript:[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1Z5JAZvW-w&feature=youtu.be[/embed]Short Cuts Episode 8: 4 Tips on How to Avoid Dreaded Zoom Fatigue“To Zoom or not to Zoom?” That is the question facing frazzled remote workers during the COVID era. While video conferencing has connected countless colleagues, there’s a growing fear that the unblinking camera eye is turning us into a nation of Zoom zombies.So, here are 4 tips to help you decide when to use video chat, so that you avoid dreaded “Zoom fatigue”.Zero In on key situations where using video conferencing adds value. Spending all day on camera takes a lot of mental energy, and can spike your stress levels while zapping your productivity.Opt-In to video happy hours with teammates…but only when you have the bandwidth to bond. Being social is a great way to connect with colleagues, but it should not be a forced experience.Organize your calendar around an array of communication methods. You might start your day with email, instant messaging, or a phone call, then transition to video chat once you get in your groove.Manage for results, not facetime. It’s critical that managers employ a more flexible style where they measure real outcomes, regardless of whether they can physically see the work getting done.Did you notice those tips spelled Z.O.O.M.?Give these approaches a shot, and you might just get rid of those pesky feelings of Zoom and Gloom....

Formulating an employee communications plan for a return to the office? Watch episode #7 of OFC SHORTCUTS to learn how an animated video can help drive behavior change by translating new health and safety rules into new habits.According to a Wharton Research Center Study, video boosts message memory retention by 50% compared to only 22% for text. So, consider creating a captivating animated video that informs and entertains BEFORE you hit “send” on a 20-page return-to-office handbook!It’s all about earning attention and inspiring action to reinforce a culture committed to workplace safety.Watch the video below, or continue scrolling to read the full transcript:[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FApjGkVaE1I&feature=youtu.be[/embed]Short Cuts Episode 7: Returning to the Office"While debate rages on about sheltering in place versus opening up the country, one thing is clear: Business leaders are now preparing plans for the eventual re-entry to company campuses and skyscrapers across the U.S. One major challenge is how best to communicate new ways of navigating these office environments when everything has changed.Now before you hit “send” on a 20-page return-to-office handbook, consider creating an animated video to engage employees. According to a Wharton Research Center Study, video boosts message memory retention by 50% compared to only 22% for text. If a successful return to office is predicated on driving significant behavior change, it’s imperative that employees remember new health and safety rules and turn them into new habits.That means wearing masks in buildings, using hand sanitizer, limiting the number of people in elevators, staggering seats in conference rooms, wiping down shared equipment, and avoiding handshakes. The growing list of new policies is staggering.Don’t even get me started on the prohibition against leftover donuts!Animated explainer videos are the perfect vehicle for delivering detailed information in an exciting and visually captivating way. From creative characters to immersive environments and kinetic text, animated videos can entertain employees while informing them of guidelines they need to know, and put into practice.Get in touch with OFC to find out how our expert animation team can help your company make a safe, smooth and productive return to work!"...

 In episode #4 of OFC SHORTCUTS, it's all about Podcasts. Podcasts have become incredibly popular, entertaining commuters and coffee breakers alike with true crime, comedy, and more. But there's another hot genre on the rise: Corporate Communications. Watch and learn how to use Podcasts for engaging your employees and connecting them with executives.Watch the video below, or continue scrolling to read the full transcript:[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2X6Two6u5Qg&feature=youtu.be[/embed]Short Cuts Episode 5: PodcastsThe moment for podcasts has arrived! More than half of the US population has listened to a podcast and an estimated 62 million Americans listen to podcasts on a weekly basis. While true crime, comedy and pop culture make up hot genres, the category of corporate communications is on the rise.Beyond the large audience, podcasting as an internal communications medium is growing because it offers a convenient tool for connecting employees with company leaders.Nearly every smartphone comes pre-loaded with a podcast app, enabling colleagues to listen during their commute or coffee break. Plus, podcasts are quick to download because audio files require little bandwidth to stream.Podcasts are especially conducive to capturing intimate conversations among executives, which helps to humanize leadership. Just be sure not to overly script dialogue, as podcast listeners love this format’s off-the-cuff sensibility.The key to a great company podcast is developing an episodic format that informs, entertains and inspires. So, collaborate with a great creative team in branding the podcast series, identifying fun features, recording a relaxed group of speakers, and assembling the best dialogue in an edit.You’re then ready to promote your podcast to employees and delight ears in every department!  ...

 Episode #3 of OFC Shortcuts provides 3 key tips for having a successful work-from-home experience. While it's tempting to stay in your pajamas and work from bed, it's important to get up and treat your home like the workplace that has now become. Undoubtedly, it can be tricky to separate your personal life from your work life while they coexist under the same roof. Watch on to learn how to get the most out of your remote work environment. Watch the video below, or continue scrolling to read the full transcript:[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSMF_V4uzW4&feature=youtu.be[/embed]The temptation to work from bed in PJs is something the OFC team ALWAYS avoids. We know it’s not easy to jumpstart your day while working from home. So, here are OFC’s top 3 tips for seizing the workday while working remote.Get up for work. Jump in the shower, get dressed, and stick to a schedule while working in an area designated for your job.Be Active. Make the switch from roaming office hallways to taking conference call walks around your neighborhood. You can also pause to play ping pong with your kids or pump out pushups and planks between emails.Take breaks. Mental health is just as important as physical health, So, be sure to unplug for quick coffee breaks or check-ins with the kids to break up the day.Striking the perfect balance when working from home isn’t easy. The key is trying new things and getting creative. Carpe Diem!...

 The face of conference call catastrophes might just be Professor Robert Kelly, whose remote video interview  with BBC News was ambushed by his dancing toddler, curious baby, and horrified wife. Over the last 3 years, Kelly’s hilarious video has generated over 36 million views on YouTube. Kelly has also spawned numerous parodies, including this gem showing how an overachieving mom might handle the same situation, which has racked-up 22 millions views. Conference call interruptions in the Berman household are a little less cuddly, typically involving 2 teenage boys barging into my home office to bicker about whose turn it is to play Fortnite on the Xbox. With that as context, here are 5 field-tested tips for combatting conference call calamities while working from home: Location For those without a home office, it’s time to get creative. A helpful guideline is to identify a space with internet access, plenty of light, electrical outlets, room for a small desk+chair, and a door that can be barricaded! Got kids? Try to avoid the kitchen or living room, given these are often the busiest and noisiest spaces in a home with children. It’s also a smart move to stay out of your bedroom if possible, given the importance of preserving that space as a soothing sanctuary for sleep and other nocturnal activity. With that said, it may not be a bad idea to retreat into a walk-in closet for critical conference calls. Just be aware that your colleagues might get distracted by your colorful holiday sweater collection. Schedules & Rules The best way to pre-empt a conference call catastrophe may be to solidify structured schedules with your spouse and children. While outlining activities for kids will maintain a sense of school-like order, it will also help ensure that your children are busy precisely when you’re on a call. Nothing quite freezes frenetic kids like a replay of Frozen…for the 100th time. It’s also a smart thing to switch off with your spouse in keeping an eye on the kids. That allows each adult to break away for calls as needed. You might also take a cue from radio broadcasters by creating a simple “On the Air” sign that can be posted to your home office door, signaling to spouse and spawn alike that you shouldn’t be bothered. Look the Part It’s hard for family members to take your protestations for privacy seriously when you’re still dressed in PJs. So, take direction from the denizens of remote work gurus who advise home workers to wake-up, shower, and dress for a regular day at the office. That guidance not only helps you feel professional and productive, but it signals to roommates that you actually mean business. Of course, there may come a day (or two) when you decide not to shower. In that case, put on a company logo shirt and ballcap to hide your lack of hygiene while simultaneously showing your team spirit. Tech Up I happen to share a home office with my wife, Elizabeth, who previously preferred the echoing joys of speaker phones. Of course, that meant a nuclear arms race of me strapping on noise-cancelling Bose headphones. I soon introduced Elizabeth to the beauty of Apple AirPods, which she now swears by. Peace and quiet have since reigned throughout the kingdom of Bermania. So, indulge in a pair of high-quality headsets. I happen to be a fan of the Apple AirPods Pro, which include noise cancelling technology that is pretty solid. You should also ensure you’re visible on video calls by shining a light on your face be it from a window or lamp. That’s especially important if there’s a strong light source behind you, like a window, that will cast a shadow on your face worthy of Darth Sidious from Star Wars. In addition, raise your monitor and camera up so that they’re level with the height of your face. Otherwise, you may be inadvertently creating a Blair Witch effect from a low camera filming up at you, thereby showcasing your nasal passages to video call participants. You’re welcome : ) Video vs. Audio It’s easy to default to audio-only calls when you’re setting-up a virtual meeting with colleagues or clients. I certainly understand plenty of people don’t like to look at themselves on camera or are embarrassed by their home surroundings in the background of a Zoom frame. However, there are a number of reasons to avoid the temptation of audio-only. First, a significant amount of successful communication comes from the non-verbal cues of facial expressions and body language. Afterall, a colleague calling your suggestion “interesting” while smiling, nodding and leaning in, is quite different than the same colleague saying “interesting” while tightening their lips, shaking their head, crossing their arms, and leaning back in their chair…especially if they fly the bird at you : ) Second, the knowledge of being on camera during a call acts to curtail colleagues from multi-tasking, given how easy it is to spot distracted colleagues. Third, seeing your colleagues on camera helps solidify team cohesiveness and camaraderie at a time when many co-workers may feel isolated and lonely. So, there you have it - 5 tips to transform your home office communications and avoid conference call calamities. Yes, I will be scouring YouTube to confirm those desk jockeys not heeding this advice. The good news is home office door deadbolt locks are now on discount at Home Depot for the rest of the week! About the AuthorJordan Berman is the Founder & CEO of OFC (ofc.tv), a creative agency and video production studio that injects storytelling into employee communications and training to earn attention and inspire action. OFC lives by the words, TYPICAL IS INVISIBLE™, and resides at the intersection of pop culture and office culture to build multimedia campaigns that create buzz, drive engagement and maximize results one cubicle at a time. Clients include PepsiCo, AT&T, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Motorola Solutions. Jordan previously held senior marketing positions at MTV, Showtime, AT&T, Black & Decker, and the DDB agency. He has a BS in Industrial & Labor Relations from Cornell and an MBA from NYU....

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